Event Title

#MeToo Means Who? Shining a Light on the Darkness

Presenter Information

Meaghan McBride, Dickinson College

Location

Stern Center Great Room

Start Date

18-4-2019 5:00 PM

Description

In 2007, Tarana Burke, a Black woman, began the “Me Too” movement, advocating for survivors of sexual assault. In 2017, Alysaa Milano, a white actress, revived this terminology on Twitter, starting a viral social movement to raise awareness about sexual violence. The revitalization initially omitted Burke and focused on Hollywood stars, highlighting the movement’s exclusivity. Through content analysis of a sample of New York Times articles, I explore how the rhetoric surrounding the #MeToo movement reinforces exclusivity or inclusivity. Findings indicate that powerful Hollywood women dominate the #MeToo narrative, focusing on serial abusers and excluding stories of women of color, working class women, male survivors, and singular cases of abuse. The focus on abusers limits a necessary emphasis on survivors and healing; exclusivity reproduces knowledge about gendered, raced, and classed constructions of victimhood and credibility, failing to provide a radical critique of patriarchal power relations that underlie sexual violence.

Presentation Type

Presentation

Comments

Advisor: Professor of Sociology Susan Rose

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 5:00 PM

#MeToo Means Who? Shining a Light on the Darkness

Stern Center Great Room

In 2007, Tarana Burke, a Black woman, began the “Me Too” movement, advocating for survivors of sexual assault. In 2017, Alysaa Milano, a white actress, revived this terminology on Twitter, starting a viral social movement to raise awareness about sexual violence. The revitalization initially omitted Burke and focused on Hollywood stars, highlighting the movement’s exclusivity. Through content analysis of a sample of New York Times articles, I explore how the rhetoric surrounding the #MeToo movement reinforces exclusivity or inclusivity. Findings indicate that powerful Hollywood women dominate the #MeToo narrative, focusing on serial abusers and excluding stories of women of color, working class women, male survivors, and singular cases of abuse. The focus on abusers limits a necessary emphasis on survivors and healing; exclusivity reproduces knowledge about gendered, raced, and classed constructions of victimhood and credibility, failing to provide a radical critique of patriarchal power relations that underlie sexual violence.