Event Title

Feminist and Non-Feminist Identity: Different Approaches to Different Relationships

Presenter Information

Emily Scheiber, Dickinson College

Location

Stern Center Great Room

Start Date

18-4-2019 4:30 PM

Description

Previous research on feminists in relationships has focused almost exclusively on the romantic and sexual relationships of largely heterosexual, white, cisgender women who self-identify as feminists. This then leaves out those who are LGBTQIA+, gender non-binary, men, and people of color. Further, past research ignores the friendships of feminists and the relationships of people who hold feminist beliefs but do not self-identify as feminists. Along these lines, past research also ignores the relationships of non-feminists with feminists. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine if there is a correlation between feminist or non-feminist identity and the different ways individuals approach certain relationships, particularly their friends, casual sexual partners, regular sexual partners, and romantic partners over others. At the time of writing this, complete results have not yet been established. However, there are recurring themes from the survey and interview data, some of which indicate that the majority of participants define a “feminist” as one who believes (and sometimes advocates for) the gender equality of (cisgender) men and (cisgender) women; and that romantic relationships are perceived as more valuable than sexual relationships, although friendships were typically ranked as either equal to or slightly lower in value than romantic relationships.

Presentation Type

Presentation

Comments

Advisor: Assistant Professor Katie Oliviero

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Apr 18th, 4:30 PM

Feminist and Non-Feminist Identity: Different Approaches to Different Relationships

Stern Center Great Room

Previous research on feminists in relationships has focused almost exclusively on the romantic and sexual relationships of largely heterosexual, white, cisgender women who self-identify as feminists. This then leaves out those who are LGBTQIA+, gender non-binary, men, and people of color. Further, past research ignores the friendships of feminists and the relationships of people who hold feminist beliefs but do not self-identify as feminists. Along these lines, past research also ignores the relationships of non-feminists with feminists. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine if there is a correlation between feminist or non-feminist identity and the different ways individuals approach certain relationships, particularly their friends, casual sexual partners, regular sexual partners, and romantic partners over others. At the time of writing this, complete results have not yet been established. However, there are recurring themes from the survey and interview data, some of which indicate that the majority of participants define a “feminist” as one who believes (and sometimes advocates for) the gender equality of (cisgender) men and (cisgender) women; and that romantic relationships are perceived as more valuable than sexual relationships, although friendships were typically ranked as either equal to or slightly lower in value than romantic relationships.