Event Title

Menstruators: Exploring the Crossroads of Biology and Gender

Presenter Information

Melissa Anese, Dickinson College

Location

Stern Center Great Room

Start Date

19-4-2018 5:30 PM

Description

Menstruation is often characterized as a woman’s issue. How does that narrative, as well as the experience of menstruation, shift when considering menstruating individuals who do not identify as women? Qualitative interviews with masculine of center individuals and trans men about their menstrual process disrupt the homogenous narrative of women as menstruators and demonstrates how gender influences the navigation of menstruation. I examine the experience of menstruation by asking my interviewees how they feel during menstruation, how they have been influenced by menstruation, and about their general menstrual practices. I have found each step of the menstrual process is done with specific intentionality and addresses areas of personal comfort, safety, and notions of self. Since menstruation in many societies, including the United States, has been hyperfeminized, this research will complicate understanding gender as a binary and will call for an exploration of gender as a spectrum while examining the complex relationship between biology and gender identity. I argue through understanding how masculine of center individuals and trans men menstruate that gender identity informs and dictates the ways in which people navigate biological processes.

Presentation Type

Presentation

Comments

Advisor: Professor Ann Hill

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Apr 19th, 5:30 PM

Menstruators: Exploring the Crossroads of Biology and Gender

Stern Center Great Room

Menstruation is often characterized as a woman’s issue. How does that narrative, as well as the experience of menstruation, shift when considering menstruating individuals who do not identify as women? Qualitative interviews with masculine of center individuals and trans men about their menstrual process disrupt the homogenous narrative of women as menstruators and demonstrates how gender influences the navigation of menstruation. I examine the experience of menstruation by asking my interviewees how they feel during menstruation, how they have been influenced by menstruation, and about their general menstrual practices. I have found each step of the menstrual process is done with specific intentionality and addresses areas of personal comfort, safety, and notions of self. Since menstruation in many societies, including the United States, has been hyperfeminized, this research will complicate understanding gender as a binary and will call for an exploration of gender as a spectrum while examining the complex relationship between biology and gender identity. I argue through understanding how masculine of center individuals and trans men menstruate that gender identity informs and dictates the ways in which people navigate biological processes.