Event Title

Negotiation of Self-Identity for Women of Color at Predominantly White Institutions

Presenter Information

Seto Olayomi, Dickinson College

Location

Stern Center Great Room

Start Date

19-4-2018 4:45 PM

Description

My research questions focuses on: “How female students of color negotiate, construct, embrace, and express their self-identities while studying at predominantly white institutions.” I examine the ways in which female students of color moderate their behavior and appearance in order to disprove or resist stereotypes; how they choose to express themselves and practice self-care in order to navigate their way through Dickinson College. In terms of identity formation and negotiation, there has been notable scholarship to suggest that women of color tend to present themselves in various ways, so as to garner a sense of legitimacy and recognition from members of dominant groups. The final section highlights the modern perception and practice of self-care. I make an effort to ascertain if self-care is seen as an act of resistance to the structures of racial and gendered domination of women of color.

Presentation Type

Presentation

Comments

Advisor: Professor Susan Rose

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COinS
 
Apr 19th, 4:45 PM

Negotiation of Self-Identity for Women of Color at Predominantly White Institutions

Stern Center Great Room

My research questions focuses on: “How female students of color negotiate, construct, embrace, and express their self-identities while studying at predominantly white institutions.” I examine the ways in which female students of color moderate their behavior and appearance in order to disprove or resist stereotypes; how they choose to express themselves and practice self-care in order to navigate their way through Dickinson College. In terms of identity formation and negotiation, there has been notable scholarship to suggest that women of color tend to present themselves in various ways, so as to garner a sense of legitimacy and recognition from members of dominant groups. The final section highlights the modern perception and practice of self-care. I make an effort to ascertain if self-care is seen as an act of resistance to the structures of racial and gendered domination of women of color.