Title

Educating Black Girls in the Early 20th Century: The Pioneering Work of Nannie Helen Burroughs (1879–1961)

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

Winter 2008

Department

Education

Language

English

Publication Title

Theory and Research in Social Education

Abstract

Using social education as a theoretical framework, this article examines the educational theories of Nannie Helen Burroughs {1883-1961), founder of the National Training School for Women and Girls in 1909, and discusses the social studies curriculum at her school. Burroughs's papers reveal her efforts to build a curriculum that blended practical, employable skills with an emphasis on racial pride, empowerment, and Christian service. An early and vigorous proponent of Black history in social studies curriculum, Burroughs encouraged her students to use their historical understanding as a tool to address contemporary problems in the Black community. She expected graduates of her school to be active citizens, and she stressed community service, current events, public speaking, and leadership within school clubs as practice for citizenship.

Comments

For more information on the published version, visit Taylor and Francis's Website.

DOI

10.1080/00933104.2008.10473358

Full text currently unavailable.

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