Document Type

Article

Publication Date

Fall 2015

Department

Art & Art History

Language

English

Publication Title

American Art

Abstract

This essay considers the impact of World War I on the painter Ivan Albright’s outlook and art by introducing a new perspective that links his immersion in medical science at the front to an expanding consumer culture in 1920s America. Albright attempted to “make statements” and “search for principles” with his art, rejecting what he viewed as a society obsessed by superficial appearance. The artist’s morose, decrepit figures in paintings such as Into the World There Came a Soul Called Ida (1929–30) defy the surface gloss of commercial culture by insisting on the body’s imperfect physicality, on its every unseemly wrinkle, mole, and pore.

Comments

This published version is made available on Dickinson Scholar with the permission of the publisher. For more information on the published version, visit University of Chicago Press's Website.

© 2015 Smithsonian Institution

The images contained in the published version of this publication are not available to download due to copyright.

DOI

10.1086/684922

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