Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-28-2021

Department

Biology

Language

English

Publication Title

PLoS ONE

Abstract

The cytokinetic contractile ring (CR) was first described some 50 years ago, however our understanding of the assembly and structure of the animal cell CR remains incomplete. We recently reported that mature CRs in sea urchin embryos contain myosin II mini-filaments organized into aligned concatenated arrays, and that in early CRs myosin II formed discrete clusters that transformed into the linearized structure over time. The present study extends our previous work by addressing the hypothesis that these myosin II clusters also contain the crucial scaffolding proteins anillin and septin, known to help link actin, myosin II, RhoA, and the membrane during cytokinesis. Super-resolution imaging of cortices from dividing embryos indicates that within each cluster, anillin and septin2 occupy a centralized position relative to the myosin II mini-filaments. As CR formation progresses, the myosin II, septin and anillin containing clusters enlarge and coalesce into patchy and faintly linear patterns. Our super-resolution images provide the initial visualization of anillin and septin nanostructure within an animal cell CR, including evidence of a septin filament-like network. Furthermore, Latrunculin-treated embryos indicated that the localization of septin or anillin to the myosin II clusters in the early CR was not dependent on actin filaments. These results highlight the structural progression of the CR in sea urchin embryos from an array of clusters to a linearized purse string, the association of anillin and septin with this process, and provide the visualization of an apparent septin filament network with the CR structure of an animal cell.

Comments

This published version is made available on Dickinson Scholar with the permission of the publisher. For more information on the published version, visit PloS ONE's Website.

This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

Open access publication of this article was made possible with grant support from Waidner-Spahr Library distributed through the Dickinson College Research & Development Committee.

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0252845

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