Title

Gender, Race, and Affirmative Action: Operationalizing Intersectionality in Survey Research

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-1-2006

Department

Sociology

Language

English

Publication Title

Gender and Society

Abstract

In this article, the authors operationalize the intersection of gender and race in survey research. Using quantitative data from the Multi-City Study of Urban Inequality, they investigate how gender/racial stereotypes about African Americans affect Whites’ attitudes about two types of affirmative action programs: (1) job training and education and (2) hiring and promotion. The authors find that gender/racial prejudice towards Black women and Black men influences Whites’ opposition to affirmative action at different levels than negative attitudes towards Blacks as a group. Prejudice toward Black women has a larger effect on Whites’ policy preferences than does prejudice toward Black men or Blacks in general. In future research, survey methodologists should develop better intersectional measures to further document these gender/racial attitudes.

Comments

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DOI

10.1177/0891243206293299

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