Title

Narrative Methods in Cognitive and Personality Psychology Research

Roles

Guest Editor: Azriel Grysman
Guest Editor: Cade D. Mansfield

Document Type

Journal

Publication Date

2017

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Publication Title

Imagination, Cognition and Personality

Abstract

Editorial (Volume 37 Issue 2, December 2017):

The following two issues of Imagination, Cognition, and Personality (Volume 37, issues 2 and 3) together comprise a special issue co-edited by Azriel Grysman and Cade Mansfield on the topic of narrative methods in cognitive and personality psychology research. We invited authors to share their theoretical, empirical, and methodological work using narrative data and to clarify their assumptions as to what narrative data mean to them.

Issue 2 begins with our introductory piece, a literature review focusing on narrative as a window on cognitive and personality processes, and narrative as a developmental mechanism. In it, in addition to introducing the other manuscripts, we consider how autobiographical narratives interplay with selfhood and how they are shaped by social interaction. We then briefly consider the methodological consequences of these various approaches.

The second paper, by Robyn Fivush, Jordan A. Booker, and Matthew E. Graci, is a theoretical review examining developmental time in two ways: how our abilities to make meaning via narrative change across the lifespan but also how narrative processing of events change us as time since the event’s occurrence unfolds.

In William Dunlop’s Narrative Identity Structure Model, he integrates McAdams’ Life Story model of identity with social-cognitive approaches that emphasize the multi-faceted and context-dependent nature of the self.

The next three articles focus on cultural aspects of narrative development. First, Monisha Pasupathi, Cecilia Wainryb, Stacia Bourne, and Roberto Posada examine how growing up with exposure to violence influence the development and portrayal of moral agency in narratives, including the themes of reciprocity and vengeance when describing harming another. Second, Qi Wang, Qingfang Song, and Jesse Bee Kim Koh write about the centrality of culture in developing memory processes, emphasizing that, in addition to the influence of early ontogeny, the conversational interaction of storytelling conditions the individual at all stages of recall. Third, Christin Köber, Ruth Weihofen, and Joachim K. Rennstich examine narratives of Congolese participants describing encounters with Europeans, showing that the way they narrate these interactions predicts their social distance from this ethnic group.

We are excited to present this first half of our special issue, which explores, in various ways, how narrative data are being conceptualized and used by psychologists. We hope you enjoy them.

© The Author(s) 2017

Editorial (Volume 37 Issue 3, March 2018):

This is the second of two issues of Imagination, Cognition, and Personality (Volume 37, issues 2 and 3) that together comprise a special issue co-edited by Azriel Grysman and Cade D. Mansfield on the topic of narrative methods in cognitive and personality psychology research. We invited authors to share their theoretical, empirical, and methodological work using narrative data and to clarify their assumptions as to what narrative data mean to them.

Issue 3 begins with two methodologically-oriented papers. Katherine Panattoni and Kate C. McLean focus on two empirical works in which coding of narrative content shows low or no correlation with questionnaire measures designed to assess similar constructs. Nicole Alea pushes readers to consider the extent of task demands in life story research, analyzing whether redemption and contamination themes emerged spontaneously or only after specific prompting.

Next, Tine Holm and Dorthe Kirkegaard Thomsen use questionnaire measures to assess self-event connections. They explore the implications of using non-narrative means of assessing personal representations of narrative memories, and consider their links to psychopathology.

Two more articles examine how narrative variables add explanatory variance to subjective well-being. Hsiao-Wen Liao, Susan Bluck, and Gerben J. Westerhof show how positive meaning making and functional memory use mediate the relationship between positive self-defining memories and self-esteem one year later. Megan V. Banks and Karen Salmon show how negative self-event connections in life story memories predict depression over and above other cognitive variables.

Finally, Dan P. McAdams provides a concluding piece to both special issues in which he considers the papers in the context of the history of narrative identity.

We are excited to present the second half of our special issue, which explores, in various ways, how narrative data are being conceptualized and used by psychologists. We hope you enjoy them.

© The Author(s) 2018


Comments

"Narrative Methods in Cognitive and Personality Psychology Research" is a two-part special issue of the journal Imagination, Cognition and Personality.

For more information on the published version(s) visit:

SAGE's Website. (Issue 2)

SAGE's Website. (Issue 3)


DOI

10.1177/0276236617740231

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