Title

Confronting Self-Discrepant Events: Meaning-Making and Well-Being in Personal and Political Narratives

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2020

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Publication Title

Self and Identity

Abstract

The present study examined the relations among meaning-making, distress, well-being, and psychological growth in both personal and political self-discrepant narratives. Politically liberal participants (N = 159) narrated a self-discrepant experience and their reactions to the 2016 presidential election. Next, they completed measures assessing well-being, depressive and anxious symptoms, psychological growth, psychological functioning, and event centrality. Narratives were coded for meaning-making. In the political narratives, meaning-making partially mediated the relation between distress and well-being and this mediation was moderated by event centrality. Meaning-making mediated the relation between distress and psychological growth, regardless of event centrality. Results are considered in the context of how making meaning from distressing events buffers against their negative impact on the self.

Comments

For more information on the published version, visit Taylor and Francis's Website.

DOI

10.1080/15298868.2020.1714712

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