Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-2016

Department

Political Science

Language

English

Publication Title

Comparative Politics

Abstract

The rise to power of movement-based parties is a new and expanding phenomenon. Existing theories predict these parties will become increasingly oligarchic as they govern nationally. The Bolivian MAS deviates from this conventional wisdom, as it has followed a remarkably different organizational trajectory that has facilitated grassroots impact and constrained elite control. Through a within-case comparative examination of MAS, this article identifies necessary conditions and explains mechanisms facilitating this outcome in the crucial area of candidate selection. Key to understanding how these parties operate is the organizational context in which they are embedded. Where civil society is strong, has mechanisms to arrive at decisions, and can agree on candidate selection, it can play an important role in resisting the oligarchization of allied movement-based parties.

Comments

This published version is made available on Dickinson Scholar with the permission of the publisher. For more information on the published version, visit The Graduate Center, City University of New York's (CUNY) Website.

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