Title

Blurring the Line Between Researcher and Researched in Interview Studies: A Feminist Practice?

Roles

Student author: Jennifer Chmielewski

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-2013

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Publication Title

Psychology of Women Quarterly

Abstract

There is a rich history of feminist critique of research methods in the social sciences, with feminist scholars noting an androcentric bias and a focus on the values and concerns of the dominant group (Harding, 1987; Reinharz, 1992). The experiences and concerns of women and girls have historically been ignored in traditional social science research or studied only in relation to men (Harding, 1987). As a result, feminists have expressed the need for methods that respect and empower women and that accept women’s experiences as legitimate sources of knowledge (Campbell & Wasco, 2000). Qualitative research has been discussed as a feminist research method because women’s voices can be heard on their own terms and the traditional hierarchy between researcher and participant can be flattened (Campbell & Wasco, 2000; Oakley, 1988; Sprague & Kobrynowicz, 2003).

Comments

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DOI

10.1177/0361684312464698

Full text currently unavailable.

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