Title

Gender Violence: Using Culture as a Resource in the Process of Decolonization

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-2012

Department

Sociology

Language

English

Publication Title

Te Awatea Review

Abstract

Gender violence is a global human rights and public health issue that affects women and children across the developing and developed world. The most common rationale given for the denial of human rights to women is the preservation of family and culture. This paper examines the situation of both Native Americans and Maori who today have the highest rates of sexual and domestic violence in their respective countries. Abuse, however, is not traditional within these communities. With colonisation came increasing violence both towards and within Native American and Maori societies. In the process of decolonisation, both Maori and Native Americans are reclaiming aspects of their traditional cultures to greater understanding and reduce violence against women and children.

Comments

Published as:
Rose, Susan D. "Gender Violence: Using Culture as a Resource in the Process of Decolonisation." Te Awatea Review 10, no. 1-2 (2012): 3-7.

For more information on the published version, visit University of Canterbury's Website.

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